THE THESIS STATEMENT IS:

1) THE OVERALL POINT OF THE ENTIRE ESSAY

2) AN IDEA WORTH WRITING ABOUT
THAT IS DISPUTED AND/OR IN NEED OF EXPLANATION

3) A COMPLETE SENTENCE

4) A SPECIFIC CONTRACT WITH THE READERS

5) A DIRECT RESPONSE TO THE ASSIGNMENT PROMPT

6) (OFTEN) THE FINAL SENTENCE OF THE ESSAY'S INTRODUCTION

7) TENTATIVE (for much of the writing process)

Visit Purdue University's Excellent Resource: Creating a Thesis Statement


IDENTIFY THE MOST EFFECTIVE THESIS STATEMENTS BELOW.  
EXPLAIN YOUR RESPONSES.

1. Although I don't know what to do, my lack of motivation needs to be
addressed somehow.

2. Although the consequences may be significant, you often have
understandable reasons for using banned drugs.

3. Although the consequences may be significant, professional athletes
often have understandable reasons for using banned drugs.

4. Given the problematic effects of childhood bullying, responsible
adults, associated with Rio Vista Elementary School, must address this
campus challenge.

5. Given the problematic effects of childhood bullying, we must address
this campus challenge.

6. Time management is the biggest problem college students face.

7. Why do so many students face the challenge of paying for their
textbooks?

8. Training, associated with the reasons, consequences, and signs of
physical abuse, may allow Upland hair stylists to join other community
professionals in working to address this sometimes fatal challenge.
THE
THESIS
STATEMENT
Cause-Effect Thesis
Statements:

** indicates topic

** may indicate if the
essay focuses on
causes, effects or both

** notes the essay's
overall point/suggests
the essay's purpose

** reflects significance,
beyond the purely
personal and/or overly
simplistic

** use of multiple
rhetorical strategies with
cause-and-effect: may
provide an overall point
which does not directly
identify causes and
effects, but
cause-and-effect analysis
strongly supports the
thesis statement